Where are the times posted from the event?

Times will be posted on www.bigdambridge100.com shortly after the event is completed.

When will the times be posted from the event?

Please allow at least 24 hours for the times to be posted after the event is completed.

My time isn’t listed, where can I find it?

If your time isn’t listed, please contact us! If you chose not to have your rider number sticker on the back seat of your bike, your time was not recorded.

Can I see the distance that the riders signed up for from the event?

We do not post the distance that the riders sign-up for since riders have the option to change course during the event. Remember, this is not a race, this is a ride! We do not intend for times do not reflect competition, but instead, personal reflection and goal-making.

Why is the time shown on my GPS unit or Cyclometer not the same as that shown on the event website?

Several reasons for the time differential are listed here.

Note: Our timing system records your time from the moment you cross the start line to the moment you cross the finish line.  It does not pause ( or adjust ) your time if you stop on the course.
Your recording unit has an auto stop / pause function enabled.  If this is the case your unit will stop timing when you stop moving.  IE: With this function on your computer enabled when you stop at an aid station the running clock on your unit will pause.
Your unit was started prior to or potentially after to cross the start of finish line.

Why is the distance on my GPS unit, Cyclometer or App different then the published course distances?

The United States government currently claims 95% Confidence Interval horizontal accuracy for civilian (SPS) GPS. Vertical accuracy is worse.  This means that on a 100-mile route a civilian GPS unit could be off up to 5 miles.  Most units are accurate, depending on tree cover, cloud cover, weather conditions and other factors well within this 5%.  So it can be seen there could easily be variance between measurements for different units.  
The course distances were set using GPS so it could be off up to 5%.  Compound that with the fact that your GPS unit could also be off by 5%.  These variables may create the potential differentials between the distance recorded on your GPS unit or Cyclometer and the GPS unit we used to measure the course.

Why do you not have the route distance certified like they do for a Marathon?

Certification of the route distances is not practical.   The certification process requires the measurement line to use the shortest distance around a curve.  If a cyclist were to attempt to follow a certified line this would require the cyclist to move back and forth across lanes of traffic creating an unsafe condition. It requires the measurement line to use the shortest distance around a curve. If a cyclist were to attempt to follow a certified line this would require the cyclist to move back and forth across lanes of traffic creating an unsafe condition.